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Humanities represents an important part of Asian Studies. Asia-Studies Full-text Online has created a section of the database service devoted to Asian Humanities. This is comprised of an infusion of new Asian Studies Humanities content providers to make the Humanities section as robust and comprehensive as the Social Sciences section.

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August, 2016

 

Source

 

 

 

Journal of Global Buddhism, Volume 17, 2016

      Research Articles

      Book Review

 

JGB

Virginia Review of Asian Studies 2016

CONTEMPORARY CHINA AND HONG KONG

RELATIONS BETWEEN CHINA, JAPAN AND THE UNITED STATES IMMEDIATELY AFTER WORLD WAR II AND AT THE PRESENT

ASPECT OF KOREAN CULTURE PAST AND PRESENT

INDIA-PAKISTAN RELATIONS

THE ROLE OF AIR POWER IN AMERICA'S RECENT WARS IN ASIA

CHINESE CULTURE PAST AND PRESENT

INDIAN ART

SCHOLARLY NOTES AND EDITORIAL ANALYSIS

BOOK REVIEWS

  • Mei Fong,
    One Child: The Story of China’s Most Radical Experiment

    Yeon Mi Park,
    In Order to Live: A North Korean Girl’s Journey to Freedom

    Paul B. Trescott,
    From Frenzy to Friendship: The History of the US-China Peoples Friendship Association

    Renaud Egreteau and Larry Jagan,
    Soldiers and Diplomacy in Burma: Under-standing the Foreign Relations of the Burmese Praetorian State

    Brief Review Notes

    Margaret Richardson,
    Between Reality and Dream: The Aesthetic Vision of K. G. Subramanyan.

    Janice P. Nimura,
    Daughters of the Samurai: A Journey from East to West and Back.
     

 

 

VRAS

Southeast Review of Asian Studies, Volume 37, 2015

ARTICLES

ESSAYS

BOOK REVIEWS

  • China

    Jinghong Zhang, Puer Tea: Ancient Caravans and Urban Chic.
    STEVEN E. GUMP
  • Kenneth J. Hammond & Jeffrey L. Richey, eds., The Sage Returns:
    Confucian Revival in Contemporary China.
    TOM PYNN
  • Daniel Bergez, Gao Xingjian: Painter of the Soul.
    DAVID A. ROSS
  • Chenyang Li, The Confucian Philosophy of Harmony.
    YIHUI SHENG

East Asia

  • Annika A. Culver, Glorifying the Empire: Japanese Avant-Garde Propaganda in Manchukuo.
    YUXIN MA
  • Todd A. Henry, Assimilating Seoul: Japanese Rule and the Politics of Public Space in Colonial Korea, 1910–1945.
    YUXIN MA

South & Southeast Asia

  • Renaud Egreteau and Larry Jagan, Soldiers and Diplomacy in Burma:
    Understanding the Foreign Relations of the Burmese Praetorian State.
    DANIEL A. MÉTRAUX
  • Srinath Raghavan, 1971: A Global History of the Creation of Bangladesh.
    MD. MIZANUR RAHMAN
  • Harry Hervey, Congaï: Mistress of Indochine.
    FAY WANRUG SUWANWATTANA
 

SERAS

Journal of Bhutan Studies  

Bhutan

Thimphu’s Growing Pains: Challenges of Implementing the City Plan, 2014. This study analyses the urban planning efforts of the government for an explanation of some unintended outcomes. A popular perception is that development in Thimphu city could do with better planning. On the contrary, there have been extensive efforts from both the Thimphu Thromde and MoWHS to control land use and regulate building design through policies like the Thimphu Structure Plan 2003-27 and its attached Development Control Regulations 2004. The question driving the research is to explain why despite the rules in place, planning goals are not achieved. The study identifies why and how actors avoid compliance to the original planning codes.

 

Bhutan

Situation of Children in Bhutan, 2011. The data on which this report is based were collected in Bhutan during the periods: 14-27 March 1989 (Wikan), 14 March to 24 April 1989 (Barth), 28 July to 21 October 1989 (Barth), 24 August to 12 November 1989 (Wikan), from published sources, reports etc., and during the remaining periods between 1 March 1989 and 15 January 1999. The field study has comprised of survey visits covering all districts except Samtse and Dagana; while visits of longer duration and repeated revisits, have been made in Paro; Punakha; Phobjikha and Rukubji in Wangdi Phodrang; Chendebji in Trongsa; Jakar and Ugyencholing in Bumthang, as well as Thimphu and environs.

 

Bhutan

Beneficiary Labour Contribution (Woola), 2005. This monograph studies the labour contributions made by households, primarily rural, to the construction and maintenance of a wide range of communal infrastructure. This study is carried out by including one-page questionnaire on ‘woola’ with the larger literacy survey form 2004, which is attached in the last page.

 

Bhutan

Te Reo, Journal of the Linguistic Society of New Zealand, Volume 58, 2015  

Te Reo

Hmong Studies Journal, Vol. 16, 2015

Research Articles

Commentary Articles

Book Review

 

HSJ

Te Reo, Journal of the Linguistic Society of New Zealand, Volume 56 & 57, 2013-2014  

Te Reo

Repatriation But Not "Return": A Japanese Brazilian Dekasegi Goes Back to Brazil, April 2015. In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Japan dispatched well over one million citizens beyond its archipelago in an effort to relieve perceived problems of scarce resources, overpopulation, and social unrest. The majority of emigrants who relocated to Japan’s Asian empire were repatriated after 1945. However, approximately half a million remained more or less permanently in the Americas, giving rise to Japan’s most significant contemporary diaspora...

 

APJ

Juche in the United States: The Black Panther Party's Relations with North Korea, 1969-1971, March 2015. In 1969, the Black Panther Party (BPP) established a relationship with the North Korean leadership that was based upon the principle of self-reliance (under the rubric of the Juche ideology), the transnational goal of Third World revolution, and a mutual antagonism toward American intervention around the world. Although the U.S. government forbade its citizens from travelling to North Korea, BPP leader Eldridge Cleaver along with other Panthers bypassed travel restrictions and visited North Korea to join anti-imperialist journalist conferences in 1969 and 1970...

 

APJ

The Asia-Pacific War and the Failed Second Anglo-Japanese Civilian Exchange, 1942-45, March 2015. The proposed 2nd Anglo-Japanese civilian exchange, originally planned for October 1942, never eventuated partly due to differences in the interpretations of what constitutes a merchant seaman and views on whether the Hague Convention should apply. The failure of the exchange meant that over 3,000 Japanese and British civilian internees as well as another 2,000 or so Japanese and American civilian internees remained in internment camps until at least August 1945...

 

APJ

The Making of "A Body in Fukushima": A Journey through an Ongoing Disaster , March 2015. “A Body in Fukushima” is an ongoing project that consists of still photographs shot by William Johnston of Eiko Otake performing in the area surrounding the Fukushima Daiichi Reactor and of video interpretations of those still photographs made by Eiko...

 

APJ

In the Face of American Amnesia, The Grim Truths of No Gun Ri Find a Home, March 2015. On the 70th anniversary of the division of the Korean peninsula, the Korea Policy Institute, in collaboration with The Asia-Pacific Journal, is pleased to publish a special series, “The 70th Anniversary of the U.S. Division of the Korean Peninsula: A People’s History.” Multi-sited in geographic range, this series calls attention to the far-reaching repercussions and ongoing legacies of the fateful 1945 American decision, in the immediate wake of U.S. atomic bombings of Japan and with no Korean consultation, to divide Korea in two. Through scholarly essays, policy articles, interviews, journalistic investigation, survivor testimony, and creative performance, this series explores the human costs and ground-level realities of the division of Korea...

 

APJ

Producing Okinawan Cultural Identity in Hawai`i's 'Multicultural Paradise', March 2015. Cultural identity, Stuart Hall reminds us, is not fixed; it is 'always in process, and always constituted within, not outside, representation' (Hall 1990: 222). This paper highlights some of the issues associated with the fluidity of identity, and the processes involved in constituting cultural identity within specific types of representation. It uses as a central platform the case of a third generation Japanese/Okinawan boy born in Hawai`i diagnosed with encephalitis, who was healed contentiously by modern US medical science, Okinawan shamanism, or charismatic Christianity, depending on the perspective of the observer...

 

APJ

The Recognition of Nuclear Trauma in Sagashite imasu (I am Searching), February 2015. The award-winning picture book Sagashite imasu (2012) was published in response to 3/11. It combines dynamic poetics with poignant photographs of relics from the Hiroshima Peace Museum to evoke emotions about extended suffering from radioactive fallout. I argue that the work plays an activist role in prompting an empathetic response which raises an ethical consciousness, and that this kind of response in turn generates a broader “recognition” of the dangers of using nuclear power in (and beyond) Japan after the Fukushima disaster.

 

APJ

Remembering Hiroshima and the Lucky Dragon in Chim↑Pom’s Level 7 feat. “Myth of Tomorrow”, February 2015. In May 2011, just one month after the 3/11 triple-disaster, the Chim↑Pom artist collective conducted an unauthorised installation of a panel depicting the crippled nuclear reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant next to Okamoto Tarō’s large-scale mural Myth of Tomorrow in Shibuya railway station. In this paper I read the installation as a commentary on the history of nuclear power and anti-nuclear art in post-war Japan. This commentary reconnects the historical issue of nuclear weapons with contemporary debates about nuclear power....

 

APJ

Performance, Mourning and the Long View of Nuclear Space, February 2015. In their responses to the Fukushima disaster, artists may struggle with the problem of representing these calamitous events in ways that connect meaningfully with audiences. Related to this is the durational experience of nuclear catastrophe; how can theatre deal with the long term effects of radiation? Some plays have tackled these issues realistically, whereas others explore the disaster in more existential ways....

 

APJ

Introduction: Art and Activism in Post-Disaster Japan, February 2015. On 11 March 2011, the northeastern area of Japan, known as Tōhoku, was hit by an unprecedented earthquake and tsunami.The disaster damaged the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, one of a number of such facilities located in what was already an economically disadvantaged region. This led to a series of explosions and meltdowns and to the leakage of contaminated water and radioactive fallout into the surrounding area. Around 20,000 people were reported dead or missing, with a disproportionate number from the aged population of the region...

 

APJ

Japan's New Empire and the Dōmei News Agency in Occupied Southeast Asia, 1942-45, January 2015. In these twenty years, foreign policy makers had to figure out how to utilize globalized telecommunication (cable and wireless) networks. Overseas events were reported almost immediately to the public, many of whom were also demanding greater political, economic and social rights. Carr argued that the propaganda institutions developed in many countries in 1919–39 because of ‘the popularization of international politics’ and more effective ‘propaganda methods’...

 

APJ

North American Universities and the 1965 Indonesian Massacre: Indonesian Guilt and Western Responsibility, December 2014. The last century has been, unfortunately, a century of holocausts. The documentary “The Act of Killing” revives the memory — for both Indonesians and Americans — of one of the greatest: the Indonesian mass slaughter of 1965, whose memory, for a half century, has been perhaps the most effectively suppressed...

 

APJ

The Two-Sen Copper Coin, October 2014. A key voice in Japan’s proletarian literature movement of the 1920s and 30s, Kuroshima Denji (1898-1943) is best known for his anti-war writings. These include a number of short stories depicting Japan’s participation in the 1918-1922 Siberian Intervention, as well as Militarized Streets (Busō seru shigai, 1930), a novel set during Japan’s 1928 military intervention in China.Militarized Streets earned the dubious distinction of being censored by both the wartime Japanese state and the postwar U.S. Occupation...

 

APJ

Protest Art in 1950s Japan: The Forgotten Reportage Painters, October 2014. The following article is a reprint of a unit developed by MIT Visualizing Cultures, a project focused on image-driven scholarship. In the coming months the Asia-Pacific Journal will reprint a number of articles on the theme of social protest in Japan originally posted at MIT VC, together with an introduction by John W. Dower to the series. These are the first in a continuing series of collaborations between APJ and VC designed to highlight the visual possibilities of the historical and contemporary Asia-Pacific, particularly for classroom applications...

 

APJ

"If We Don't Face Our past, We're Bound to Repeat the Same Mistakes." Japanese Wartime Medical Orderly Reports on Army's Role in Maintaining "Comfort Women" System, October 2014. For years, Abe Shinzo, Japan’s prime minister, has been playing with diplomatic fire over a sordid episode of wartime history that has been at the center of a storm of controversy involving Japan, China, Korea and other outposts of Japan’s empire: the herding of thousands of women across Asia into Japanese military brothels. His decision this year to order an investigation into a landmark government apology to the so-called “comfort women” might have helped end the controversy. Instead, it has further ignited it, which may indeed have been Abe’s intention – he has campaigned for nearly two decades to undermine the apology...

 

APJ

Democracy's Porous Borders: Espionage, Smuggling and the Making of Japan's Transwar Regime (Part 2), October 2014. Itagaki Kōzō was an orphan of empire. At the end of the Asia-Pacific War, then aged fifteen, he was stranded in the former Japanese colony of Karafuto (Sakhalin). His father, a coal miner, had died in a mining accident when Itagaki was a child, and his mother had been killed in the brief but fierce fighting that erupted as Soviet forces swept into the southern half of Sakhalin following the USSR's declaration of war on Japan on 8 August 1945...

 

APJ

Democracy's Porous Borders: Espionage, Smuggling and the Making of Japan's Transwar Regime (Part 1), October 2014. Close to the lotus-filled expanse of Shinobazu Pond in Tokyo’s Ueno Park, a narrow back street leads into a driveway that curves between mossy walls to the top of a small hill. At the summit stands an imposing mansion whose neo-Jacobean facade, fronted by tall palm trees, would look more at home in the streets of a nineteenth century European spa town than in the midst of twenty-first century Tokyo...

 

APJ

Reality through Fantasy: Miyazaki Hayao's “Anime” Films, September 2014. Hayao Miyazaki, who in November, 2013 announced his decision to retire from active film-making, is a name well-known to serious film lovers all over the world. The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in August, 2014 announced that he will be awarded an Honorary Oscar (Lifetime Achievement Award) at the Academy’s 6th Annual Governors Awards on November 8, 2014. The only other Japanese director to have received this prestigious award was the legendary Akira Kurosawa (in 1990). He will now be in the same league of filmmakers that includes the likes of Jean-Luc Godard, Satyajit Ray and the world renowned animator Walt Disney...

 

APJ

The Japan-Korea Solidarity Movement in the 1970s and 1980s: From Solidarity to Reflexive, September 2014. The Japan-Korea solidarity movement to support the democratization of South Korea was active throughout the 1970s and 1980s in Japan among Korean residents (Zainichi1) and Japanese intellectuals and activists. Korean activists in the democratization movement have recalled the widespread international support of that era (Chi 2003, 2005; Park 2010; Kim 2010; Oh 2012), and Zainichi and Japanese activists have written about their activities in numerous books and memoirs (Chung 2006; Tomiyama 2009; Shouji 2009; Chung 2012)...

 

APJ

Korean Film Companies in U.S. Occupied Japan: Imagining an Independent Korean Cinema in a Transnational Mediascape, September 2014. This study reveals the history of little-known film companies founded by Koreans in U.S. Occupied Japan (1945-1952). At a time when a powerful tide of decolonization and “ethnic renaissance” energized the cultural activities of newly liberated Koreans in both Japan and the Korean peninsula, the practical activities of Korean film companies in Occupied Japan were entangled in the economic, ideological, and cultural realities of the era. While these companies produced few original titles, they were nevertheless active in re-screening existing films in new contexts...

 

APJ

Sōka Gakkai Founder, Makiguchi Tsunesaburō, A Man of Peace? September 2014. Readers familiar with my research will know that its focus has been on the wartime actions and statements of Japan’s institutional Buddhist leaders, most especially those affiliated with the Zen school. Nearly to a man, their actions and statements were strongly supportive of Japanese aggression and imperialist actions. In the postwar era many of these same Zen leaders played a seminal role in the introduction of Zen to the West...

 

APJ

Political Protest in Japan, Part II, September 2014. Between 2002 and 2013, the Visualizing Cultures (VC) project at M.I.T. produced a number of “image-driven” online units addressing Japan and China in the modern world. Co-directed by John Dower and Shigeru Miyagawa, VC tapped a wide range of hitherto largely inaccessible visual resources of an historical nature...

 

APJ

"Comrade Carlos Bulosan": U.S. State Surveillance And the Cold War Suppression of Filipino Radicals, August 2014. Much of the recent scholarly attention on Asian American activism has focused on the 1960s and 1970s. This essay seeks to expand the time frame of Asian American radicalism by documenting the U.S. government’s persecution of Filipino radicals during the Cold War. No effort is made here to answer the question of whether or not the individuals targeted by the FBI were actually communist party members...

 

APJ

Feeling Disconnected: Exploring the Relationship between Different Forms of Social Capital and Civic Engagement in Japan, Published 2014. This paper analyzes the role of social connectedness in motivating citizens to take an active interest in society and to engage in communal activities. Japan is used as an example of a society which has been diagnosed with a weakening of social bonds, as well as with an increase in social inequality and precarity in recent years...

 

DIJ

Gender and Political Participation in Post-3/11 Japan, Published 2014. In the aftermath of the triple disaster of March 11, 2011, concerned parents throughout Japan formed over 300 social movement organizations nationwide for the protection of children from radiation. Especially mothers have become active within that organizational network. For many of them, it is their first time to become politically active...

 

DIJ

Why Do We Still Need to Talk About "Historical Understanding" in East Asia? August 2014. In Japan today, a spirit of “dislike China, hate Korea” is widespread. Since the summer of 2012, when territorial disputes over the small Senkaku/Diaoyu and Takeshima/Dokto islands became the focus of diplomatic struggle with these neighboring East Asian countries, and even more so since the real possibility has emerged of an armed clash with China, a view has spread in Japan that denies the need to keep talking about historical understanding of the first half of the twentieth century...

 

APJ

Dirty Wars: French and American Piaster Profiteering in Indochina, 1945-75, August 2014. With its economy devastated by war, its national glory sullied by ignominious defeats at the hands of Germany and Japan, and its colonial legacy morally undercut by the Atlantic Charter, France in 1945 faced immense challenges. Especially daunting was the job of restoring its empire, particularly in distant Indochina. For French political leaders and imperialists who equated empire with national greatness, simply granting Indochina its independence was out of the question. But reoccupying the lost colony would be no easy matter...

 

APJ

The Radiation That Makes People Invisible: A Global Hibakusha Perspective, August 2014. Radiation makes people invisible. We know that exposure to radiation can be deleterious to one’s health; can cause sickness and even death when received in high doses. But it does more. People who have been exposed to radiation, or even those who suspect that they have been exposed to radiation, including those who never experience radiation-related illnesses, may find that their lives are forever changed – that they have assumed a kind of second class citizenship...

 

APJ

Zen Masters on the Battlefield (Part II), July 2014. In Part I of this series we looked at the battlefield experiences of Sōtō Zen Master Sawaki Kōdō during the Russo-Japanese War of 1904-5. Sawaki’s battlefield reminiscences are relatively short, especially as he had been severely wounded early in the war. Nevertheless, he was able to express the relationship he saw between Zen and war on numerous occasions in the years that followed...

 

APJ

The Sloppy Realities of 3.11 in Shiriagari Kotobuki's Manga, June 2014. “What is important, I think, is to feel that something is real. I feel that “sloppy” things are real. If I were asked “Why?,” though, I could only reply, “Because that’s who I am.” I suppose I could puff myself up and say “Because the world is a sloppy place, that’s why.” This world is half-baked, half-assed, all Buddhist “impermanence” – such that when you say this, it is really that, and when you think you have it here, it is over there. So yes, all that we know for sure is that we are always in the process of change. So what happens when the world changes? Well, the world is going to end, of course...

 

APJ

"Banzai!" The Compulsory Mass Suicide of Kerama Islanders in the Battle of Okinawa, June 2014. This is the text of an interview with Kinjo Shigeaki (85) about his experience as a survivor of the compulsory mass suicides which occurred on Tokashiki Island, Okinawa in late March 1945. The interview took place on April 23rd 2014...

 

APJ

Changing Modes of Political Dialogue Across the Middle East and East Asia, 1880-2010, May 2014. East Asia’s relationship with the Middle East today is based mainly on economics and is devoid of grand political projects of solidarity and intellectual dialogue. Countries such as China, Japan and Korea present the Middle East with a model of state-led capitalist neoliberal economic development. At the same time, the redemptive transformation of East Asia into a globally powerful region offers a trajectory of development diverging from the Middle East, struggling with political turbulence, regime crises and regional wars both cold and hot...

 

APJ

Yellow Blood: Hepatitis C and the Modernist Settlement in Japan, May 2014. Japan has one of the highest rates of hepatitis C virus infection in the industrialized world. This endemic and the challenges it poses for the future of Japan’s healthcare system stem, ironically, from the formation of a modernist settlement beginning in the late 19th century. Modern techno-scientific solutions to political problems inadvertently provided millions of opportunities for hepatitis C to spread in rural communities, among leprosy communities, the traumatized postwar community and into the national blood supply...

 

APJ

The Dulles Brothers, Harry Dexter White, Alger Hiss, and the Fate of the Private Pre-War International Banking System, April 2014. The election of Dwight D. Eisenhower in 1952 had permanent consequences for U.S. foreign policy. The U.S. major oil companies, which before the election were facing criminal charges for their cartel arrangements, instead were freed to continue their activities, until “In some of the faraway countries where it did business...

 

APJ

The American Deep State, Deep Events, and Off-the-Books Financing, April 2014. The issue of Saudi Embassy funding of at least two (and possibly more) of the alleged 9/11 hijackers (or designated culprits) is so sensitive that, in the 800-page Joint Congressional Inquiry Report on 9/11, the entire 28-page section dealing with Saudi financing was very heavily redacted.56 A similar censorship occurred with the 9/11 Commission Report...

 

APJ

German Institute for Japanese Studies (DIJ) Working Papers  

DIJ

"Why on earth is something as important as this not in the textbooks?"–Teaching Supplements, Student Essays, and History Education in Japan, January 2013. The economic setbacks suffered by Japan in the early 1990s brought with them a sense of social malaise that has lingered to the present. In recent years, only a small minority of Japanese believe that their country is on the right track and while “Abenomics” has public confidence on a slight upswing, it is far too early to tell if this will hold...

 

APJ

Lavish Are The Dead: Re-envisioning Japan's Korean War, December 2013. In 1957, a young Japanese writer published a collection of short stories which quickly attracted nationwide attention. The title of the collection - Shisha no Ogori - is particularly difficult to render into English, but has been translated by John Nathan as Lavish Are The Dead. The writer was Ōë Kenzaburō, and the success of this, his first published book, was the start of a career that would ultimately bring him international fame and a Nobel Prize for literature...

 

APJ

The Formation and Principles of Count Dürckheim's Nazi Worldview and his interpretation of Japanese Spirit and Zen, December 2013. Japan, the “yellow fist”, as he called the nation in “Mein Kampf”, caused Adolf Hitler a considerable headache. In his racist foreign policy he distrusted the Asians in general and would have preferred to increase European world supremacy by collaborating with the English Nordic race...

 

APJ

The Harbin An Jung-Geun Statue: A Korea/China-Japan Historical Memory Controversy, December 2013. The Chinese and South Korean governments have recently announced the building of a new monument to An Jung-Geun in Harbin. An is most famous for his 1909 assassination of Itō Hirobumi, a high Japanese official who framed the Meiji constitution, served as prime minister, and is credited with being one of the great modernizers of the Meiji period...

 

APJ

Miyazawa Kenji's Prophetic Green Vision: Japan's Great Writer/Poet on the 80th Anniversary of His Death, November 2013. When Miyazawa Kenji was writing his stories and poems nearly a century ago, Japan was a country with a two-pronged mission: to become the first non-white, non-Christian nation to create a modern prosperous state...

 

APJ

D.T. Suzuki, Zen and the Nazis, October 2013. The always contentious, sometimes highly emotional, debate over D.T. Suzuki’s relationship to Japanese fascism continues unabated. Among other things this is shown by reader reactions to a recent article in Japan Focus entitled “Zen as a Cult of Death in the Wartime Writings of D.T. Suzuki". This debate can only intensify by the further assertion of a wartime relationship between D.T. Suzuki and the Nazis or, more precisely, a positive or sympathetic relationship between Suzuki and the Nazis. This article, in two parts, will explore that possibility though conclusive proof of such a relationship will not be included until the second part...

 

APJ

A Tale of Two Decades: Typhoons and Floods, Manila and the Provinces, and the Marcos Years, October 2013. In the second half of the twentieth century, typhoon-triggered floods affected all sectors of society in the Philippines, but none more so than the urban poor, particularly the esteros-dwellers or shanty-town inhabitants, residing in the low-lying locales of Manila and a number of other cities on Luzon and the Visayas. The growing number of post-war urban poor in Manila, Cebu City and elsewhere, was largely due to the policy repercussions of rapid economic growth and impoverishment under the military-led Marcos regime...

 

APJ

Now On My Way to Meet Who? South Korean Television, North Korean Refugees, and the Dilemmas of Representation, October 2013. In 2011, the recently established South Korean broadcasting network Channel-A launched Ije mannareo gamnida (Now on My Way to Meet You), a program whose format brings together a group of a dozen or more female talbukja (North Korean refugees)2 on a weekly basis. These women interact with host Nam Hui-seok, an additional female co-host (or, in the earlier episodes, two), and a panel composed of four male South Korean entertainers...

 

APJ

Cooking the Books: The Federal Bureau of Narcotics, the China Lobby and Cold War Propaganda, 1950-1962, September 2013. As influential contributors to national policy, intelligence professionals inevitably face strong political and bureaucratic pressures to shape their assessments to fit official or factional policy. In the modern era, such pressures have contributed to costly, even disastrous, escalations of the Vietnam War, the arms race, and, most notoriously, Washington’s conflict with Saddam Hussein’s Iraq...

 

APJ

Reading Volcano Island: In the Sixty-fifth Year of the Jeju 4.3 Uprising, September 2013. I was eight or nine when M samchon (“Uncle M”) arrived at our house in Japan on one of his regular late-night visits. In fact, it seemed as if he chose to visit at this hour, as if he was hiding from something or someone. Although he was not really related to us, he came from the same part of Korea, Jeju Island, and we referred to him using the term samchon, a Jeju term used when addressing uncles and aunts. He spoke in the Jeju tongue, which was unlike any of the other versions of Korean that I had heard at that time...

 

APJ

New Zealand Journal of Asian Studies, Volume 11 No. 1, June 2011  

NZJAS

New Zealand Journal of Asian Studies 2009-2010  

NZJAS

The Limits of Sovereignty and Post-War Okinawan Migrants in Bolivia, August 2013. This paper examines the legal implications for Okinawan migrants of Article 3 of the San Francisco Peace Treaty (hereafter SFPT), signed between Japan and most of the Allied Powers in 1951. Particularly, it analyses the case of post-war Okinawan migrants in Bolivia, showing how the legal conditions in the Ryukyu Islands were extended to the Andean country...

 

APJ

The Korean War and Sino-North Korean Friendship, August 2013. The relationship between China and North Korea is a subject that attracts much discussion and speculation in today’s policy circles and media. The history of Sino–North Korean friendship is typically traced to the time of the Korean War (1950–1953), although in North Korea it tends to go further back, to the colonial period...

 

APJ

Miyazaki Hayao's Kaze Tachinu (The Wind Rises), August 2013. Miyazaki Hayao‟s new film Kaze Tachinu (The Wind Rises) premiered on July 20 and is on pace to become one of the most successful, if not the most successful, Japanese films of 2013. Miyazaki tells the story of Horikoshi Jiro, the designer of the “Zero Fighter”, which was a terrifyingly effective weapon deployed against China, the United States, and its allies in the early war years...

 

APJ

Zen as a Cult of Death in the Wartime Writings of D.T. Suzuki, August 2013. The publication of Zen at War in 1997 and, to a lesser extent, Zen War Stories in 2003 sent shock waves through Zen Buddhist circles not only in Japan, but also in the U.S. and Europe. These books revealed that many leading Zen masters and scholars, some of whom became well known in the West in the postwar era, had been vehement if not fanatical supporters of Japanese militarism...

 

APJ

Cosmetic Surgery and Embodying the Moral Self in South Korean Popular Makeover Culture, June 2013. You only have to spend a day in Seoul to realize that appearances do matter in contemporary South Korean society. Advertisements for various cosmetic surgeries are conspicuous everywhere—from taxis to public transport and underground stations, all evidence that the industry is booming...

 

APJ

Much Ado over Small Islands: The Sino-Japanese Confrontation over Senkaku/Diaoyu, May 2013. More than six decades from the San Francisco Treaty that purportedly resolved the Asia-Pacific War and created a system of peace, East Asia in 2013 remains troubled by the question of sovereignty over a group of tiny, uninhabited islands. The governments of Japan, China, and Taiwan all covet and claim sovereignty over the Senkaku/Diaoyu islands...

 

APJ

After Hiroshima, May 2013. By taking on the incomprehensible destruction wrought by the atomic bomb in the book After Hiroshima, artist elin o’Hara slavick faces a void of annihilation that transcends expression, and yet, with meticulous care and consciousness, she produces photographic exposures that illuminate the unspeakable. Through works of troubling beauty, slavick enacts a temporal rupture, unearthing a moment that has been relegated to the historical past by saying, with stark but quiet clarity, that Hiroshima 1945 is not over...

 

APJ